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Driver Metal Fatigue

warbirdlover

Ender of all threads
Supporting Member
Jul 9, 2005
19,077
5,573
central Wisconsin
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United States United States
I've mentioned this before but this is a good point for convincing your partner in life why you need to buy a new driver every year or maybe more..

metal fatigue, weakened condition induced in metal parts of machines, vehicles, or structures by repeated stresses or loadings, ultimately resulting in fracture under a stress much weaker than that necessary to cause fracture in a single application.

Now this happens more frequently when the metal is subjected to more frequent use such as when limp plays 250 rounds a year. If you are playing an old driver your driver face could be just one swing away from shattering. You'll also notice an extreme loss in distance from when the club was new. Many blame this loss of distance is caused by the operator aging so will compound the problem by going to whippy, wet-noodle limp senior flex shafts.

I've been criticized for buy multiple new drivers every year but in fact I KNOW that when the honeymoon is over it means that your driver face is just wore out. Actually I continue to address this issue every year by buying multiple new drivers. Are you beginning to understand how this works?
 

Louie_T07

Well-Known Member
Sep 19, 2008
1,636
1,193
Sarnia, ON
Country
Canada Canada
I've mentioned this before but this is a good point for convincing your partner in life why you need to buy a new driver every year or maybe more..

metal fatigue, weakened condition induced in metal parts of machines, vehicles, or structures by repeated stresses or loadings, ultimately resulting in fracture under a stress much weaker than that necessary to cause fracture in a single application.

Now this happens more frequently when the metal is subjected to more frequent use such as when limp plays 250 rounds a year. If you are playing an old driver your driver face could be just one swing away from shattering. You'll also notice an extreme loss in distance from when the club was new. Many blame this loss of distance is caused by the operator aging so will compound the problem by going to whippy, wet-noodle limp senior flex shafts.

I've been criticized for buy multiple new drivers every year but in fact I KNOW that when the honeymoon is over it means that your driver face is just wore out. Actually I continue to address this issue every year by buying multiple new drivers. Are you beginning to understand how this works?
A wise man once said...

Got my notepad and pencil out for this one. Much thanks!!
 

jhmeg2

Well-Known Member
Sep 16, 2011
1,427
924
Hancock, Wisconsin
Country
United States United States
It takes a LOT of rounds and higher speeds to weaken the face to the point of failure. Does it happen? absolutly. in a year or two, no. I have had one driver that had a dead face. I have had one driver crack (on the sole plate). I think you just like buying new drivers. nothing wrong with that.
 

Fairwaysplitter3320

Recovering Equipment Ho...off the wagon again.
Staff member
Admin
Sep 7, 2013
11,036
7,748
Chapel Hill, TN
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United States United States
It takes a LOT of rounds and higher speeds to weaken the face to the point of failure. Does it happen? absolutly. in a year or two, no. I have had one driver that had a dead face. I have had one driver crack (on the sole plate). I think you just like buying new drivers. nothing wrong with that.
^^^this
 

ualtim

Carrollton, TX
Supporting Member
Aug 20, 2005
7,703
2,288
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United States United States
Now that you have a Stealth you have kind of bought your way out of using this excuse. Better start researching graphite fatigue.
 

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