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Driver shaft flex

warbirdlover

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There is all kind of advise on the web that say if your driver shaft is too stiff you'll slice and if too soft you'll hook. Also if your driver shaft is too stiff you'll lose distance. I disagree with this blanket statement. I think there's alot more to it. Golfer's swing, flex point of shaft (low, mid or high) and probably shaft torque.

In almost 50 years of playing this silly game I've normally found a stiff flex works best for me even though I'm borderline for the recommended swing speed. And if a driver shaft is too soft I will spray it all over the place and have a slice I can not get rid of until I go to a stiffer flex golf shaft.

I think the swing mechanics play a role in it that is not considered by these experts. I've hit two X-flex shafted drivers in my life and hit both straight. And didn't lose distance, actually hit them longer. But we all know that one golf shaft company's stiff flex might be another company's regular flex.

What say you? And we're talking about golf driver shafts not what your dirty minds are thinking!
 

TrickyPutt

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Did you know there are illegal bicycles? The racing weights are capped around 15 pounds. The super stiff bikes can be lighter like even 6lbs and cost $25,000 or more. Why would anyone bother?

Its the same principles as those stiff shafts, the less human energy lost to bending and flexing and the lighter weight not costing as much energy in human torque to power, the faster you can climb a hill.

Until I bailed out of the mid torque shafts, I couldnt get improved distance with control. I think the idea of "feel" is misleading. Hit the bomb accurately, and only then you know the correct "feel".
 

limpalong

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WBL... Your are correct. There is no "textbook" that can define what shaft is best for what player. Those who suggest specific cpm's of a shaft or the "R/S" on a shaft are for folks of a particular swing speed are merely wanting to sell merchanidse. I can't hit an "R" flex in driver or irons. Yet, my swing speed is probably what one would consider 'senior flex' range. I used to hook the shot out of fairways and hybrids. Went to "R" flex in those and the hook became a nice straight ball to a slight fade. That is just the opposite of what some "internet authorities" will claim.
What it boils down to is what YOU can hit well. Folks can tell us we need "R" flex or we need blades or we need a particular compression ball. Those who suggest what I need can suggest all they want. Respectfully, "Go pound sand!!" WBL and I will hit what we want to and what gets the ball into the hole in the fewest strokes for US!!!
 

Badgergolfer

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Theres so many things that come into the equation with shaft flex. Swing speed and tempo are huge but really feel is big too. Some people prefer to feel the shaft loading and some people like a stiffer shaft because they dont want a shaft that feels whippy. Im kind of inbetween S and R but I play R because I like the feel of the shaft loading and then releasing at impact.
Ive tried stiff flex and Ive always found that I was overswinging because I couldnt find that feel of the shaft loading. With r-flex, I can just make a nice, easy swing and it gives me a mid ball flight with a nice, little draw.
 
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warbirdlover

warbirdlover

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Another point is that, as amateurs (some worse then others) our swing speed (swing) is not consistent so IMHO a reg flex shaft shows that by scattering your shots. A stiffer flex shaft would probably be less affected by inconsistent swing speed.
 

Badgergolfer

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Another point is that, as amateurs (some worse then others) our swing speed (swing) is not consistent so IMHO a reg flex shaft shows that by scattering your shots. A stiffer flex shaft would probably be less affected by inconsistent swing speed.
Perhaps. A stiff shaft may not load up enough though and could be costing you distance due to less spin. For me, I don't scatter my shots but I have a very smooth swing and good tempo. Someone who has a more abrupt swing and a quicker tempo may need that stiffer shaft.
I've always heard the claims of better accuracy and more consistent ballstriking with stiff flex but I've never found that to be the case with my swing.
 

Badgergolfer

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IMO another thing and one that is often overlooked is that there is no industry standard for flex. From one brand or even one model of shaft to the next, shafts of supposedly the same flex can perform very differently. I person can't stand Project-X shafts because to me, they feel like they don't load properly. I've even tried the 5.5 and it still feels like a piece of rebar.
 
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warbirdlover

warbirdlover

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IMO another thing and one that is often overlooked is that there is no industry standard for flex. From one brand or even one model of shaft to the next, shafts of supposedly the same flex can perform very differently. I person can't stand Project-X shafts because to me, they feel like they don't load properly. I've even tried the 5.5 and it still feels like a piece of rebar.
Good point.
 

Badgergolfer

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Again though, thats why theres so many different shafts and why you should never just buy a club off the rack without being fit for it, especially irons. Considering the fact that it doesnt cost any more to get fit than to buy off the rack (and if they try to charge you for it, walk out the door), I honestly dont know why you wouldnt get fit.
 
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warbirdlover

warbirdlover

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Again though, thats why theres so many different shafts and why you should never just buy a club off the rack without being fit for it, especially irons. Considering the fact that it doesnt cost any more to get fit than to buy off the rack (and if they try to charge you for it, walk out the door), I honestly dont know why you wouldnt get fit.
You live in the boon docks of central Wisconsin where you have to drive 40 miles to get to a store? Really you are correct. Just had to throw that out.
 

limpalong

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Again though, thats why theres so many different shafts and why you should never just buy a club off the rack without being fit for it, especially irons. Considering the fact that it doesnt cost any more to get fit than to buy off the rack (and if they try to charge you for it, walk out the door), I honestly dont know why you wouldnt get fit.
Guess I'm just too old and grumpy. Been "fit" twice for driver shafts. Both times, I bought the driver with the recommended shaft. Couldn't hit the broad side of a barn with either one. Got rid of the clubs and took a beating on the cost.
Golf Digest ran an article some years ago. Took, IIRC, 4 players. One was a mini-tour player. One was a mid-handicap lady. One was a 10 handicap. The fourth was a 20 handicap. All four went to the same fitters. Two of the fitters were with major OEM club manufacturers. The other two fitters were well known and had been in the business many years. It was amazing how different these golfers were fit at different shops. I believe one was fit for "x" flex at one fitter and "R" flex at another. Lie angles were different recommendations from different fitters.

Until you convince me I can go to three qualified fitters and be fit with the exact same specs at each one, I don't see the benefit of a "professional" fitting. Which "professional" is correct? Is it the one you just happen to find at the local Dick's?
 

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