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Getting fitted for clubs?

LyleG

gear head
Aug 10, 2006
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Thanks Lyle. By 'feel' I mean soemthing useful that can help the player, feeling something but not knwoing what it is afaiac, is just irrelevant. Unless the ball flight changes I can't see how it can be of benefit, knowing something feels different, not knowing what it is and not seeing any visible changes in flight.. CPM numbers on their own are just meaningless though aren't they? Was it Tim who said ' its just a number':)


1/3 of a flex can begin to affect ball flight, be it slightly but it can affect it. Changes in feel are also important. If something doesn't feel right to player the make changes, be them conscious changes or changes that occur subconsciously. CPM numbers are an excellent resource when used correctly. When we use it compare shafts of the same make and model, and to match the flex of irons in a set. For example if you're comparing a TTDG and project X shaft the cpm numbers are useless. When comparing 2 TTDG shafts however, the cpm numbers give us a way of knowing precisely how much different in flex one shaft is from the other.
As for Tim saying its just a number, he was referring to swing weight.
 

PhillyEagle

Well-Known Member
Feb 3, 2007
271
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In my opinion if you don't play too often (once a month or so) a general fitting of flex (based on swing speed), length (WTF and how it looks in set-up), and lie angle (done on lie board) will be enough.

edit: What is the statistics on average handicap? Something like in the past 20 years the average male golfer still averages the same handicap now that was the average 20 years ago? With all this technology and everything, it shows how to equipment doesn't make as big as a difference as it's perceived.

Would the average handicap drop if with the use of this technology was combined with proper fitting? I'm sure it would drop, but only slightly IMO again.
 

RickinMA

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
Feb 3, 2007
1,845
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Would the average handicap drop if with the use of this technology was combined with proper fitting? I'm sure it would drop, but only slightly IMO again.

I'm not sure it would only be slight - there are a lot of poor shots made all over the course with 3 irons and LWs. How many times have you seen someone with a putter that didn't quite look right? Imagine shorter drivers that kept the ball in play...

I think I remember reading that 1* of lie angle was good for like 20' left/right of the target with a PW - for many, that could be the difference between on the green and putting or in the bunker

I think it could have a noticeable difference on handicaps
 

LyleG

gear head
Aug 10, 2006
6,388
28
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Canada Canada
I agree with Rick on this one.

I see countless 20 hdcp players playing shafts that are way to stiff for then, this robs them of distance and hurts their chances of squaring the club face at impact. Add in drivers that are far longer than they can control, with lofts that are too low and you have a recipe for a long day at the track.

With irons I cant even count how many times I have seen 20+ cap players tromping around the course with blades shafted with TTDG S300 shafts. They have no chance of playing well with those.

Same for putters. Bad lengths and lie angles cost people a lot of strokes.
 

PhillyEagle

Well-Known Member
Feb 3, 2007
271
0
Yeah I agree, but I think that even 'club fitters' at retail stores are able to get most golfers into a okay set (flex/loft/lie/length). I can't see a 20 handicapper noticing much of a difference between a general fitting versus an extensive fitting (no offense to you -- I'm blaming the golfer's swing faults - not the club maker).

I can definitely see golfers with caps 12 and below benefitting greatly from a fitting that takes hours of detailed work with a knowledgable club maker.

It's like who does your taxes, if you have Accountant A ($100/hr) and Accountant B ($300/hr). If you don't make a lot of money and the better accountant can only save you $150, you might as well just go with Accountant A. If you make a lot of money and Accounant B can save you $1000 for the year, then yeah...go to Accounant B.

And apologies in advance for a terrible analogy :laugh:
 

LyleG

gear head
Aug 10, 2006
6,388
28
Country
Canada Canada
Yeah I agree, but I think that even 'club fitters' at retail stores are able to get most golfers into a okay set (flex/loft/lie/length). I can't see a 20 handicapper noticing much of a difference between a general fitting versus an extensive fitting (no offense to you -- I'm blaming the golfer's swing faults - not the club maker).


I disagree for one main reason. The equipment at retail stores is one size fits all for the most part. Well actually 2 sizes fit all. We have stiff and Reg, 9.5º and 10.5º all 45 inches long, hardly a plethora of fitting options wouldnt you say? I liken it to a shoe store that only sells two shoe sizes, 11 and 12. Yes you can still wear the shoes and get from point A to point B, but it wont be as easy however as if the shoes actually fit.
 

RickinMA

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
Feb 3, 2007
1,845
27
not sure I'm following either of you guys but I am an accountant who wears shoes.
I want my clubs to fit me and I want a clubmaker to tell me I'm being a FOOL for playing a 2 or 3 iron or a "strong 3 wood" or point out any of the other poor bag-makeup choices many/most golfers make.
 

dave.

Well-Known Member
Mar 20, 2005
5,926
2
"As for Tim saying its just a number, he was referring to swing weight."

I know, just jesting
 

gunning4u

Well-Known Member
Dec 31, 2006
694
0
I'm not a new golfer, but I want to get serious this year. Been golfing for 3 years now and been using a crappy stock set of ram's. i just want to make sure I do everything right. I'm looking to get a driver,irons and a new wedge. I will be going with the ft-5 draw bias stiff 9*, and titlest sm wedge not sure what degree. The irons i'm not sure on yet. I just want to get fitted so i don't waste money. Might as will do it right.

H3 I would at least try and go to a Golf Smith and get on a launch monitor so you can get your swing speed, ball speed, spin ratio, and launch angle for your driver. They have carts there and you can figure out your optimum launch angle and spin ratio for your driver. I have been on simulators before but never a true LM and I found out that I was playing with not enough loft and too soft of shafts. If your looking at getting irons I would at least hit some balls with some impact tape on the bottoms, to see if you need your clubs bent. Last year I taped some up myself and found I was impacting out near the toe. I had my irons bent 2* upright and I could tell a big difference. For length take a floor to wrist mesurement if your 32" to 36" you should be right around standard + or - maybe a 1/4".
 

Augster

Rules Nerd
Supporting Member
Mar 9, 2005
1,473
23
I'm not a new golfer, but I want to get serious this year. Been golfing for 3 years now and been using a crappy stock set of ram's. i just want to make sure I do everything right. I'm looking to get a driver,irons and a new wedge. I will be going with the ft-5 draw bias stiff 9*, and titlest sm wedge not sure what degree. The irons i'm not sure on yet. I just want to get fitted so i don't waste money. Might as will do it right.

As Stanters said, go with Wishon.

If you truly want to get the best fitting clubs for your swing, and you are serious about getting better, then for sure look for a PCS Class A clubfitter in your area. If there aren't any PCS A members in your area find out if there are any GCA (Golfsmith Certified) fitters. A lot of times the PCS fitters will also have their GCA certifications also.

As Lyle said a TRUE fitting takes quite some time. You usually need to come into the shop at least twice. Once for the fitting and at least once to try out the clubs. Then maybe again to make any final corrections. A REAL and true fitting is actually quite an exciting process because at the end of it you will end up with the best fitting clubs you have ever hit.

In the bolded line in your quote, I would hold off on such a purchase until you actually get fitted. As long as you are shelling out for a complete makeover, why not get the driver fitted correctly for length, face angle, loft, SW, grip, flex etc. etc. You may only hit ONE parameter (maybe ZERO) that actually fits your actual swing from buying a driver off the rack.

Lastly, some fitters are better than others. As was stated above, if you have the time read Wishon's book, "Search for the Perfect Golf Club." If you want a more recent book, pick up Wishon's, "Search for the Perfect Driver". Both of these books will tell you what you can expect from a REAL fitting.

Once you have found a fitter or two in your area give them a call and ask them what all will be done during a fitting. No better time than springtime.
 

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