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Kids on golf courses

phantomgolfer

Well-Known Member
Sep 20, 2004
5
0
Kids are not always welcome at golf courses (especially in USA) says an article http://www.travelgolf.com/departments/editorials/kids-golf-access-691.htm
The writer speaks from personal experience. He relates instances of how the people at the counters were rude when they came to know that his 7-yr-old son was going to play and the writer would only supervise Though I agree that the people could have been polite but allowing kids on the golf course is inviting trouble.
 

bdcrowe

ST Homeland Security
Aug 30, 2004
2,207
276
phantomgolfer said:
Kids are not always welcome at golf courses (especially in USA) says an article http://www.travelgolf.com/departments/editorials/kids-golf-access-691.htm
The writer speaks from personal experience. He relates instances of how the people at the counters were rude when they came to know that his 7-yr-old son was going to play and the writer would only supervise Though I agree that the people could have been polite but allowing kids on the golf course is inviting trouble.
I totally disagree. Golf is a game of values, and I use it to help teach my son character, honesty, gamesmanship, etc... I also use it to create that parental bond with him. Ask Tiger Woods, Jack Nicklaus, Arnie, just about any golfer, what their fondest memories are. Time spent on the course with their dads. And if they hadn't been taken to the course with their dads, we'd have never seen them, and our beloved sport would be a footnote. And since we're banning them and killing that interest and that outlet for father-son bonding, why don't we go ahead and ban them from baseball parks while we're at it?

I do believe it is the father's responsibility to schedule rounds at off-peak times, allow faster groups to play through, pick up or help the kid out if he's in too much trouble, etc..., but to say banning kids from the course is good is just asinine. Let's impliment your additude and watch the game decline to the history books.

We have 3 posts from you so far, one asking us for an opinion on a driver you've already hit, one asking us if women should be allowed on the course, and one saying kids shouldn't. You do the math. Hopefully you'll quit reading all of these articles and post something more appropriate, like hand grippers or something. Peace.
 

IrishGolfer

Fac ut gaudeam
Supporting Member
Sep 1, 2004
6,544
4,977
bdcrowe said:
I totally disagree. Golf is a game of values, and I use it to help teach my son character, honesty, gamesmanship, etc... I also use it to create that parental bond with him. Ask Tiger Woods, Jack Nicklaus, Arnie, just about any golfer, what their fondest memories are. Time spent on the course with their dads. And if they hadn't been taken to the course with their dads, we'd have never seen them, and our beloved sport would be a footnote. And since we're banning them and killing that interest and that outlet for father-son bonding, why don't we go ahead and ban them from baseball parks while we're at it?

Good call Dr. Crowe. My sons are 4 and 2 respectively. I've already got them up hitting balls at the course (you shoul dsee the 2 year old swing, awesome) and I love the thought of them playing with my wife and I, when they are 10, 12 yars old. My fear is that neither of them will develop an interest for the game, which I will have to respect. But there's no way some idiot is going to discourage me from giving them a chance to learn.

Portstewart is fortunate enough to have 54 holes to choose from and it actively encourages kids to play, albeit at certain times of the day. I started playing when I was 10 years old. I spent every summer playing 54 holes a day. It was a safe place to be. I wasn't getting into trouble etc. I was playing off 6 at the age of 15, thanks to the time I spent at the club. I was more aware of golf etiquette than a lot of the adult members. I have also spend a lot of time playing at North Berwick in Scotland. I used to live near there. The article is quite right about attitudes to golf.

How exactly is having (supervised) kids on the course inviting trouble? I'm interested in where you sit with this...
 

jc@bg

Style guru
Sep 10, 2004
94
0
Kids on the course

What BD said. I'll admit that I am one of "those" who like to play golf fast and unencumbered--which is to say, at MY chosen pace--but the golf course, like every other public venue, is not all about me.

I got a very good lesson in this area a couple of weeks ago. I came off the course right at sunset, walking in from the 7th hole rather than wait for a slow group ahead (there wasn't enough time to finish before dark). In the parking lot, a guy I recognized but didn't know nodded to me and commented that the nights were getting shorter. I agreed, told the guy my name, and shook hands with him. He mentioned that he'd seen me on the course a lot in the evenings, then said that he hoped he and his son hadn't held me up (they were 2 or 3 holes ahead of me, with another foursome in between). Then the guy commented that a foursome ahead of his son and him had held them up for the entire 9 holes. Even though they waited on the foursome at every tee, his "take" on the situation was that the foursome thought a 9-year-old couldn't possibly play well enough to stay out of their way, if they let the twosome (father/son) through. His son, the father explained, hadn't scored higher than 46 on the front nine the whole year. As he said, "It's a shame when people judge a golfer's skill or pace of play by appearance [rather than objective observation]."

My wife and my 22-year-old daughter sometimes play a round with me at the same club, and you would not believe how infrequently we are invited (as a twosome) to play ahead or play through a foursome of what turn out to be 110-shooters. My wife breaks 90 almost every round, I break 80 almost every round, and we play "ready golf" to the max, walking toward our own balls as soon as we play (just taking care not to get in the line of fire), so that we're ready to hit our next as soon as the other hits her/his shot. Daughter doesn't play as well, but she walks fast and is ready for the next shot very quickly.

Point? I may have once assumed that a 9-year-old couldn't keep up with the pace of play in front of or behind him/her, but no more. Other golfers play how they play, no matter their size, shape, age, sex, etc. What burns my buns is the guy who, because he is in his regular game with his regular Saturday cronies, acts like he owns the course and should be immune to playing through--even though he only ever hits it far enough to lose his ball in the deep stuff. If you carry an assortment of ball-retrievers for every depth and width of water hazard, you KNOW WHO YOU ARE. Too much said already.
 

bdcrowe

ST Homeland Security
Aug 30, 2004
2,207
276
IG, JC, thanks for the input; well said. After a first, indignant, reply to this thread, I now like the fact that phantom brought it up. I whole heartedly disagree with him, but I think it is good to get in the open. Apparently this view is far too widespread, and in this format seems easy to poke holes into. That is good.

IG, I really envy you your young start. I picked the game up at 29, around 3 years ago and it truly is hard to teach an old dog new tricks. Due to the late start, and negative mental baggage about how hard the golf swing is for me, my learning curve has been huge. My son, starting casually at 4, is a little mimick and picks up SO QUICKLY. He can see a good golf swing a few times and literally do it with little to no instruction. He will not have that negativity to overcome if he chooses to persue this beautiful folly we enjoy so.

It does my heart so good to see the pride in his eyes when I say, "Nice shot, Little Big Man!" Or the concentration when I say, "Where did those dancy feet come from?" Or even the look of concern when he occasionally forgets manners on the course. While many 7 year olds forget relationships in trade for video games, my son is asking me to play catch, or take him to the course. Phantom is actually going to tell us there is no place for this. Sad.
 

buddha33

aka Dick Ramser
Aug 31, 2004
390
0
You really need to get a grip, crowe........No. 2 Gripper, that is!!!!!!!

:xxrotflma
 

bdcrowe

ST Homeland Security
Aug 30, 2004
2,207
276
buddha33 said:
You really need to get a grip, crowe........No. 2 Gripper, that is!!!!!!!

:xxrotflma
That's my point. Again, I'm an old dog; those things are for the young pup. I may buy the #2 for my son, tho. It'd definitely keep him quiet while I'm watching TGC.
 

Rockford35

Shark skin shoes
Staff member
Admin
Aug 30, 2004
21,801
1,083
Canada
Country
Canada Canada
You are listening to a born and bred kid golfer here. I learned to play when i was 4, hitting the odd ball on every couple of holes with my grandparents.

But, they were keen enough to know when and why i was hitting. They knew when there was no one around that it wasn't a problem. This meant, not on a weekend when the course is super busy, and not when they were paired with another pairing. I mean, that just makes sense, doesn't it?

I've reiterated the point over and over that I think it's great that kids or adults who know the game, the rules of the game, and how to know when you are outside your strengths. If you're hitting your 8th shot on a par 4 and you're 150 from the green, pick it up. It helps everyone, including yourself. You obviously need more range time before you should try tackling a big course. I have no problems playing with people of all levels of game. I play on a regular basis with two guys that shoot 110-120 almost everytime. But, they know when to call it quits on a hole. I appreciate that more than someone that stick handles the ball into the cup for a tight 15 on a par 4.

Kids are the future of this sport. BUT, there needs to be supersvision, i agree. There's no sense sending out a couple kids that have no clue what or why they are doing that, it's important to have someone there to instruct and oversee.

That was the best part of playing with my grandfather. He was the one that told me to drop the driver and play only my 3 wood off the tee for control until I got my driver working more consistently. He was the one that showed me that the bump and run chip worked so much better for consistency than trying to hit the perfect PW shot. He was the one that showed me that a texas wedge out of a bunker was alot easier that hitting a blast shot that i had never practiced.

You'll learn these tricks yourself, but its so much better having someone with experience to help you along the way. It keeps them happy, your scores improving and everyone else on the course happy.

I'm living proof of that. I wouldn't have it any other way.

Unless, he started me out with a set of blades. That bastard! :D

First set:

Wilson Persimmon 3 wood, cut to 7 iron length
Hogan 7 iron, cut to PW length
Wilson "pure" putter, cut to length.

I loved those clubs. Still do.

R35
 

DaveE

The golfer fka ST Champ
Aug 31, 2004
3,986
3
We have a large number of retirees and weekender's in our neighborhood so kids & grandkids on the course are common. I've never had a problem with it. Well, maybe jealousy because I didn't get to start playing until I was an adult.

What I see most often is the adults picking up a ball to keep things moving, like Rock mentioned, or letting groups play through. I have a fourteen month old grandson that I already gave a set of plastic clubs to. I hope he ends up taking an interest since neither of my girls did. If he does we'll be on the course and not in anybody's way. That makes me sound kinda old doesn't it? :fart:
 

Rockford35

Shark skin shoes
Staff member
Admin
Aug 30, 2004
21,801
1,083
Canada
Country
Canada Canada
It sure does, old man. It sure does. ;)

Good to see you're sparking an interest in the game with your kids. Sure, they may not take to it, but maybe they will. Plus, i'd rather have my kids or (hehe) grandkids playing golf than stealing cars and getting into trouble.

Not that your kids would Dave. Show them golf so they don't follow in their father's footsteps.... :D

R35
 

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