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My slice?

jmack

Well-Known Member
Apr 20, 2005
15
0
I understand that my slice is due to my opening up the clubhead, but I was wondering if anyone knew of any effective excecises to help correct this. Also, is there a certain shaft that would help correct this (stiff, soft) ?
 

Rockford35

Shark skin shoes
Staff member
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Aug 30, 2004
21,801
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Canada
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A slice is actually caused by an over the top, or outside in swing. When you bring your club down on the downswing in slow motion, do you get the feeling as if you are "casting" the clubhead like a fishing rod? This is usually a good indication that your swing plane is wrong.

A slice won't be cured by a shaft. It's all mechanics.

Try this. Go to the range and hit a few balls. Try slowly "pushing" the clubhead away from the ball from address to about "2 o'clock" (the ball being 12) and then slowly bringing the shaft and clubhead back inside that initial plane at about "4 o'clock". This is a very exagerated swing thought, but it starts you to understand where the club should be as you swing it back and through.

Give it a bunch of goes and work yourself up to a full swing. Hit balls at 25%, 50%, 75" and then finally 90%. You never wanna go ape when you are making swing changes, you just end up more pissed off that way.

Hope this helps.

R35
 

obagain

Used club guru
Mar 29, 2005
998
1
The shaft can make it worse but not help.

A driver with offset will help a little.
Try putting a headcover uner each arm and don't let them fall thru the complete swing. It is impossible to cast the club when your arms are in the correct spot.
 

Loop

Well-Known Member
Aug 27, 2004
1,418
3
Waggle the club. Very important, as it rehearses you downswing and also the backswing, but in a mini fashion. As you take the club just in front of the ball, check to see that your clubface is square.
 

JasonMacIsaac

Titleist and Cleveland
Feb 23, 2005
467
1
This drill may help me, I noticed over the offseason when changing my swing I tend to bring it back slightly outside the normal path and try to drop it at the top. I could catch a few rockets but the majority were slight slices.
 
OP
J

jmack

Well-Known Member
Apr 20, 2005
15
0
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #6
Okay, so I went to the range for the first time in forever tonight. I was hitting alright, but was still slicing. I tried the drills some showed, and they seemed to help some. Near the end, I was KILLING some, but pulling them badly. At the very end, still killing them, and a little straighter, but still a pull. Could someone help me visualize what rockford is trying to tell me? I'm kind of confused by it.
 

Slingblade61

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
Aug 26, 2004
6,046
129
Set up in front of a wall (for visualization).

Imagine a large clock on the wall. after contact imagine throwing the club out to 2 o'clock rather than 11 o'clock.
 

Loop

Well-Known Member
Aug 27, 2004
1,418
3
lol...
Imagine you're standing in the center of a giant clock. In front of you would be 12 oclock. At your right is 3 oclock and left is 9. Then reread Rock's post, and you'll understand a little further.
You can always put a stick or a club that goes from the ball, and is angled about 30 degrees down to your right. Then in the downswing, try making the clubhead go on that line. It's called swinging in to out. But it won't do you any good if you can't square the clubface.

Also, if you're slicing or pulling, you have an out-to-in swing, but your clubface is either square or closed at impact.
 

Bravo

Well-Known Member
Aug 27, 2004
5,822
15
FWIW - the "clockface" concept is widely used in golf instruction, for all kinds of situations and clubs - so understanding it can be helpful in your learning process...

There have been several good suggestions here. Try to re-read and go at it again.

BTW, "the mystery of the slice" goes unsolved by millions of golfers - so it can be hard to understand and cure.
 

IrishGolfer

Fac ut gaudeam
Supporting Member
Sep 1, 2004
6,544
4,977
JMack, a slice, eh? Here's what you should do.

Firstly sink a bottle of Jack Daniels. Then imagine standing in a sea of snakes with several clocks ticking, the sky red and your intestines hanging out. Put a hand grenade under each arm and hang electrodes from your scrotum. Now take the club all the way back to your childhood, change sex and then come through the ball like there is no tomorrow. Cast iron slice cure, simple really.

LOL

Sorry, but reading everyone's (genuine) input is really confusing. I don't even slice and I'll bet I start to now. Best bet is to go and get a lesson and try and keep it simple. JMO.
 

JasonMacIsaac

Titleist and Cleveland
Feb 23, 2005
467
1
I am willing to bet money it has to do with spine angle and the right shoulder dipping. Keep your shoulders level throughout the full swing and release the club. That should get rid of the fade.
 

goatster

SUPER SOAKER
Feb 20, 2005
2,360
2
i dont know if this will help you,but it worked for me.i consentrate on keeping my right elbow tight to my side on the down swing and rolling my right arm over my left though impact.of course im right handed so if your alefty it would be opposite.this tech. is somthing i picked up while trying to hit a draw.
 
OP
J

jmack

Well-Known Member
Apr 20, 2005
15
0
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #14
So, I went out and hit today and things went a LOT better. I tried everything everyone said; I was pulling my backswing to 6, and my foreswing to 2. I kept my back shoulder straight (weird I forgot about this, it was a BIG problem for me when I played baseball). By the end, it was barely tailing, and making me really happy. Only thing was, I was working on my mechanics, so I was only swinging maybe 60-65%. Oh well, thanks everyone for the suggestions, they really helped.
 
I

Ian Jones

Guest
Well done

Reading the solloutions to a slice has been very informative and I can't wait to try these remedies myself. I particularly liked Irish Golfers remarks, think I might skip that one though. As a perenial slicer the clock solution seems to be a logical one and one II will work on next time I go to the practice area.
 

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