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Reshafting to Regular Flex? Worth it?

ksreynolds74

Active Member
Aug 25, 2010
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I've got a set of MacGregor VIP Irons, the graduated cavity/forged type. I have true temper stiff shafts in them. I hit my 7I about 150, 6I at about 160.

I have a Professor Johnson 10 degree driver with their standard graphite shaft, also in stiff flex. I hit this driver 230-235 tops.

I've laid off playing for the last 5 years, with 2 kids getting older. Now that my youngest is 2, I'm playing more and going to the range more.

Would I be better off reshafting to regular flex clubs? I'm wondering if my clubs are too stiff and I'm losing distance? Seems like a lot of money to reshaft...perhaps the $$ is better spent on lessons?
 

TheTrueReview

"Playing it straight"
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Jan 8, 2009
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I wholly agree about lessons. Some teaching pros are club fitters as well. If so, the pro should be able to assess your swing speed & tell you if regular flex would be recommended.
 

limpalong

Mental Ward Escapee
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Oct 18, 2006
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With irons, it's not how far... it's how many. My older Pings are much weaker lofts than most irons manufactured today. So, I don't hit a specific iron nearly as far as some counterparts. I'm also in my mid-60s and will play most anyone from the back tees.
Go back into history when Karsten was selling Eye 2s faster than Lady GaGa sells records. He believed the ZZ Lite shaft was good for all... low cap, high cap, men, ladies. The ZZ Lite came in one flex... stiff. His take was that you needed consistency over distance. Don't worry about distance with your irons. Learn each, intimately, and how far YOU hit that particular club. Once you can repeat a swing and repeat distances... with some semblence of accuracy... you will score better.
You driver is the only club you really need to hit for distance. Most weekenders are far better off 230 in the fairway than 280 in the trees. I've never heard of a "Professor Johnson" driver. Is it 460cc? What shaft? How is the ball getting from the tee to your 230 yards? Slice? Fade? Draw? Hook? Are you skying the driver? Or, do worms duck for cover when you step to the tee box?
Get some help with your driver? Lessons!! Certainly never hurts. Fitting!! By a bona fide fitter! Again, I'm mid-60s. Bad knees, bad back, too fat, too old, just a compete lack of atleticism. I've tried regular shafts and senior flex shafts. None work as well for me as stiff flex shafts. And, I will hit the ball out there with a large percent of those who play this game. It's what works for YOU!!
Consistency with irons... Utilize the most recent shaft technology with your driver... You'll play well and have fun doing it!!!!
 

beermug

Gawwwwn
Aug 25, 2010
88
0
i think you just need some time getting use to them,actually playing again,getting the feel back,you had a 5 year layoff and,so just give yourself time and then after playing for a while you can reevaluate your clubs,
 

warbirdlover

Ender of all threads
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Jul 9, 2005
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I hit my 7-iron shorter then you hit yours. So what. As long as you know how far you hit them it's all that matters. What's the advantage of hitting a 5-iron 200 yards? Then you'll need a dozen wedges for the short yardages.
 

BrandonM7

Well-Known Member
Nov 23, 2007
1,156
2
I hit my 7-iron shorter then you hit yours. So what. As long as you know how far you hit them it's all that matters. What's the advantage of hitting a 5-iron 200 yards? Then you'll need a dozen wedges for the short yardages.

Sure is nice to see someone hit it that far, though. With good course management they could kill. The only people I know with length like that don't have it, though - bomb a 300+ drive or a 200yd 7i, then they're left with 50yds in and no club for it. One long-hitting buddy carries a 68° wedge -- I didn't even know those existed -- and he still finds himself too close to the green to get anything figured out. I swear though, with his distance he could be scratch easily if he'd learn to play smart. I'm glad he doesn't, because that lets my short-hitting ass keep up with him.
 
OP
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ksreynolds74

Active Member
Aug 25, 2010
3
0
  • Thread Starter
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The Professor Johnson club is a Liquidmetal driver, probably 5-6 years old. It's 360cc....I'm not much for upgrading to the latest and greatest unless I have to. When I'm feeling confident with it, I hit it with a slight draw. Occasionally I'll leave the face open and slice it (on mis hits), almost never hit a hook. Usually, it's bad aim/alignment or not getting through the ball.
 

scgamecock

Well-Known Member
Feb 5, 2009
136
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I hit my 7-iron shorter then you hit yours. So what. As long as you know how far you hit them it's all that matters. What's the advantage of hitting a 5-iron 200 yards? Then you'll need a dozen wedges for the short yardages.

I hit my 5 iron 195 on a normal swing. I'de say there a pretty big advantage. I'm hitting a five iron into what you might be hitting maybe a hybrid or a wood.

I hit pitching wedge 135, my 54* 115, and my 60* 80, all on a normal smooth 85-90 percent swing. From 135 and in, I don't have much trouble, and bunch more wedges wouldn't help when i do. In fact, I could probably have success with just a pitching wedge. I used to carry a 52, 56, and 60, that i hit 120, 100, and 80 respectively. But the 54 is easy enough to hit 100 yards, and to put a little extra on, that i recently scrapped a wedge.

I don't mean any disrespect, I just have trouble understanding that length is a bad thing. I've had short hitters whoop my ass. But the main argument i hear is that 280-300 yard drivers are at a disadvantage because they'll hit it through the fairway or too far on a dogleg. But in reality in means they get to pull out they're 3 wood, hybrid, or even an iron on a hole that short hitters are forced to hit driver on. Obviously course management in the key, but length is certainly not a disadvantage.
 

BrandonM7

Well-Known Member
Nov 23, 2007
1,156
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I hit my 5 iron 195 on a normal swing. I'de say there a pretty big advantage. I'm hitting a five iron into what you might be hitting maybe a hybrid or a wood.

I hit pitching wedge 135, my 54* 115, and my 60* 80, all on a normal smooth 85-90 percent swing. From 135 and in, I don't have much trouble, and bunch more wedges wouldn't help when i do. In fact, I could probably have success with just a pitching wedge. I used to carry a 52, 56, and 60, that i hit 120, 100, and 80 respectively. But the 54 is easy enough to hit 100 yards, and to put a little extra on, that i recently scrapped a wedge.

I don't mean any disrespect, I just have trouble understanding that length is a bad thing. I've had short hitters whoop my ass. But the main argument i hear is that 280-300 yard drivers are at a disadvantage because they'll hit it through the fairway or too far on a dogleg. But in reality in means they get to pull out they're 3 wood, hybrid, or even an iron on a hole that short hitters are forced to hit driver on. Obviously course management in the key, but length is certainly not a disadvantage.

I agree. As long as you play it right and can control it, length is an obvious advantage. If it weren't, the PGA tour would be full of people hitting their driver 235yds.
 

limpalong

Mental Ward Escapee
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Oct 18, 2006
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I agree. As long as you play it right and can control it, length is an obvious advantage. If it weren't, the PGA tour would be full of people hitting their driver 235yds.

No, you won't get far on the Tour hitting it 235 yards. That's why we're not the ones on television on Sunday. But, driving distance isn't the "Holy Grail" of scoring... or winning money on tour.

Take the top 10 money winners on Tour this year. #1 is #78 in driving distance. #2:10, #3:183, #4:19, #5:54, #6:101, #7:133, #8:191, #9:2, #10:106. I'd take Tim Clark's $3 million in winnings and be #191 in driving distance vs. some of the longest players having trouble making cuts.

The PGA of today is played on highly manicured courses where "bomb and gouge" has been able to make spectators moan in ecstasy. The average weekend player is not blessed to play on the same high-end courses on a regular basis. We must put it in the short grass to even have a chance to score.

Iron technology hasn't changed a lot over the past 10 to 15 years. Driver and shaft technology, on the other hand, has changed dramatically. A properly fit shaft... with today's driver heads attached... can provide added distance and accuracy. One without the other greatly handicaps the player's ability to card scores that keep us coming back to this frustrating game.
 

MGP

Clubmaking Ho
Supporting Member
Apr 21, 2007
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Distance isn't everything, even on the PGA Tour. Yesterday "Cheetah" (as Limp calls him) averaged 255 on his drives and was 7 under and tied for the lead. He also hit 13/14 GIR, I suspect that had a lot more to do with the -7 score than anything.

I'm a short hitter and keep the ball in play. When I hit greens and scramble well I can shoot in the high 70's. When I'm not straight (thankfully not that often), I may be in the low 90's. I'll take straight and a good short game over not straight regardless of the distance you hit the ball. It's also a style of play that will serve you until you are old and physically can't play anymore.
 

BrandonM7

Well-Known Member
Nov 23, 2007
1,156
2
Obviously distance isn't everything, that's a big durrr. But it seems like everyone thinks you can't possibly be good at other aspects if you hit it far. So you have a good short game and hit the ball straight - good scrambling, etc. If you kept all those skills but were able to hit 20% farther across the board, is it not obvious that you'd be able to score better? Every time distance is mentioned people start preaching about short game and putting and short grass and all this, as if those things have to be mutually exclusive. I don't get it.
 

Youngun5

Beware of the Phog!
Aug 26, 2004
2,734
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Obviously distance isn't everything, that's a big durrr. But it seems like everyone thinks you can't possibly be good at other aspects if you hit it far. So you have a good short game and hit the ball straight - good scrambling, etc. If you kept all those skills but were able to hit 20% farther across the board, is it not obvious that you'd be able to score better? Every time distance is mentioned people start preaching about short game and putting and short grass and all this, as if those things have to be mutually exclusive. I don't get it.

I think the point that is trying to be made with their comments is that the stereotypical longer hitters can't do the other things very well. We've all played with that one guy that could bomb it...but then makes Michael J Fox look calm once they get anything shorter than an 8 iron in their hands...

You are correct though, there is no reason that both cannot be obtained for someone of appropriate physical ability. (just keep in mind there's a lot of old guys on here...:emot-angel:)

If we're about the same distance out...and you have to hit 5 iron or 4hybrid into a green, while I hit 7 iron...and you can put it closer than me...then more power to you, but I would take that challenge every time.
 

scgamecock

Well-Known Member
Feb 5, 2009
136
0
Obviously distance isn't everything, that's a big durrr. But it seems like everyone thinks you can't possibly be good at other aspects if you hit it far. So you have a good short game and hit the ball straight - good scrambling, etc. If you kept all those skills but were able to hit 20% farther across the board, is it not obvious that you'd be able to score better? Every time distance is mentioned people start preaching about short game and putting and short grass and all this, as if those things have to be mutually exclusive. I don't get it.

Amen. EVERY time people mention distance, they say "i'de rather be a short hitter and nail gir all day. I'de rather be short and in the fairway then long and in the trees all day." Well, I would rather be both.
 

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