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Review of Motocaddy S1 Trolley/Cart/Buggy

TheTrueReview

"Playing it straight"
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Jan 8, 2009
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Australia Australia
Guys,

I recently picked up a Motocaddy S1 battery powered trolley/cart and can heartily recommend it. I'm Australian based and we mostly refer to trolleys or carts as buggies. My review is tailored for Australian members but I think Motocaddy is available around the world. It is UK made so it is definitely available there.

Enjoy!!

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Intro

The 3 usual options for transporting your golf bag around the course is either to (1) carry them, (2) pull or push a buggy containing the clubs (either by human or battery propulsion), or (3) drive them around in an electric cart.

From my experience there can be polarized views about which is the ‘better’ option. In my view, there is no one better option. It comes down to the personal preferences and circumstances of each particular golfer.

The purpose of this review is not to persuade that any one of the above options is better than another. If you prefer to walk the course while carrying your clubs in a stand bag or if you prefer to drive an electric cart, that is fine. Rather, the purpose of this article is merely to review a type of electric buggy available for those who prefer to walk the course without carrying their clubs.

ai392.photobucket.com_albums_pp2_thetruereview01_Motocaddy_IMG_23792.jpg


Background

Prior to reviewing the Motocaddy S1 electric buggy, my favoured option was to use one of the more popular brands of (human powered) push buggy; an option I found generally effective. Most of the better 3 wheeled brands roll along easily and pushing a buggy allowed me to walk the course (unless it was one of those courses that insist on electric carts). The main problem with push buggies is thick grass or the law of gravity can make them damned hard to push at times. Think lots of grunting and sweating in hot and/or hilly conditions.

Features

The Motocaddy S1 has a 200w electric motor which is powered by a 22 amp 12 volt battery. It has an ultra lightweight aerospace grade aluminium frame, with a weight of 7.6kg (excl. battery). In fact, in the U.K. one variation is sold without the battery and motor as a push buggy (Motocaddy S1 Lite (Silver))

The Motocaddy S1 comes with a diagnostic system that enables the user to identify a particular problem in the unlikely event that one arises. It has quick-release wheels with freewheel groove making it possible to complete a round, if a problem ever occurred with the battery or motor. The buggy has a one touch stop/start, set and variable distance control, and a current speed readout. When it comes to putting the buggy in the boot of the car, it has a space-saving, locking fold flat system.

The Motocaddy S1 also comes with a seat and a sand bucket hook, which are Australian add-ons because seats are a rarity in the UK and apparently sand isn’t used on their courses to repair divots. I understand that a metal ring to hold the sand bucket will soon replace the sand bucket hook. The seat is padded and has storage underneath the lid. If you don’t want to use the seat it can be left off without a problem.

A range of other accessories is available for the Motocaddy.

ai392.photobucket.com_albums_pp2_thetruereview01_Motocaddy_IMG_23832.jpg


Main competitor

The main competitor of the Motocaddy is the Australian made MGI SL50 electric buggy. My review is not a comparison or critique of the MGI buggy, and I’m sure the MGI has its followers. Per chance, however, I had an MGI buggy demonstrated to me in a local golf store and after tinkering with its controls I am able to say that in my view the on/off button of the MGI (by virtue of the waterproof cover on the button) is less effective than the Motocaddy’s. That is because the Motocaddy has a simple stop start button which can be tapped on/off with a finger. The same cannot be said for the MGI. The plastic waterproof cover on the MGI’s switch prevents a simple tap on/off which could be an issue if an operator inadvertently lets the buggy get away from him/her and is reaching out to try and stop it.

Price

The price of electric buggies such as the Motocaddy seems to be around the $800 to $1,000 mark. In my view it’s money well spent because a round of golf is certainly more enjoyable with it carrying the clubs for you. A lot of the good quality push buggies come in at $200 to $300, so an electric buggy is not the much more of a stretch if you consider how long you will have the buggy.

How did the Motocaddy perform?

My review was performed over three rounds of 18 holes in the sweltering Christmas heat. In short, the Motocaddy came through with flying colours. The makers claim that the motor is whisper quiet and they are right. When the going gets tough and thick grass or uphill fairways are encountered, the motor is as quiet as it is on rolling flat ground.

The battery is only rated for 18 holes but I understand that 2 x 18 holes in a day without recharge are not out of the question. Certainly the battery handled the hard test I put it through. I have a heavy cart bag which carries my ‘kitchen sink’ of accessories and effects, so the Motocaddy had a fair bit of weight to push around. I didn’t do the buggy any favours either by not avoiding any slope or elevated green in order to put it through its paces. It ate up any hill, slope or thick-grassed area.

The buggy has a fixed front wheel and there’s a reason for that. The makers of the Motocaddy deliberately fixed the front wheel so that it would not deviate from it’s set direction, if the front wheel became caught in a rut or groove in the ground. That said, it is important to make sure the weight is evenly distributed in the left and right pockets of the golf bag. If too much weight is on one side of the golf bag, I observed it could cause the Motocaddy not to travel in a straight line but instead, in a long arc. But to put it in perspective, if the golf bag is properly centered the Motocaddy travels as straight as a die. Even if the weight of the bag is centered on one side, it is easy to put the Motocaddy back on track by a gentle touch on the T-handle bar.

Pre-set distance controls allow an operator to set it to travel either 15, 30 or 45 metres ahead before stopping. This is a handy feature if an operator wanted to deviate and help their playing partner to find a their ball or to buy a drink from a cart girl but wanted the cart to keep going in the original direction.

I certainly enjoyed walking the fairways and letting the Motocaddy do all of the hard work (especially in the sweltering conditions). I also finished the round a lot fresher than I would have if I had to push or pull a buggy. In fact, I wish I’d had a Motocaddy for my August trip to Canberra last year when I had to push my clubs up and down the hills of the Federal Golf Course.

I give the Motocaddy S1 a double thumbs up. If you are considering getting an electric buggy or even a push buggy, the Motocaddy is well worth a look. More information can be found here -> Motocaddy Australia Electric Golf Buggy

ai392.photobucket.com_albums_pp2_thetruereview01_Motocaddy_IMG_23822.jpg
 

88cupfan

Well-Known Member
Jan 5, 2009
60
0
I recently played with a fellow who had one of these buggies. His had a remote control that he could steer , start and stop the buggy with. He never had to touch the handle. The remote was small enough to slip into his pocket with ease and has a clip for his belt, which is where he kept his. The cart was faster than we walked and was waiting for him when he got to his ball. Does this model have a remote option?
 
OP
TheTrueReview

TheTrueReview

"Playing it straight"
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Jan 8, 2009
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  • #3
I recently played with a fellow who had one of these buggies. His had a remote control that he could steer , start and stop the buggy with. He never had to touch the handle. The remote was small enough to slip into his pocket with ease and has a clip for his belt, which is where he kept his. The cart was faster than we walked and was waiting for him when he got to his ball. Does this model have a remote option?

Perhaps it could have been the next model up -> the Motocaddy S3 Motocaddy Australia Electric Golf Buggy
 

JEFF4i

She lives!
Supporting Member
Jul 3, 2006
13,531
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While an interesting and in-depth review, I find it far from True. I mean, TheTrueReview giving a True Review? It seems fishy, all I'm saying.
 

ManchesterGolfer

AKA.... Obi-Wan Ho-Nobi
Jan 4, 2006
3,467
0
I have the S3 Digital and its an awesome piece of kit. I've had it roughly 12 months, it has done 550 miles and I've not had a single issue with it as yet (touches wood). The S3 has a electronic display which displays, temp, time & speed. It also has 3 yardage meters... 2 of them you can set to 0 at anytime so you can messure how far you've hit a ball or the total yardage of a round and the 3rd clocks up the total mileage the trolley has run, it only counts when the motor is running so pushing on the flat or rolling down hill doesn't clock up milage. It's not remote control....I think the remote control one which was refered to ealier is more than likely one of the Stewart trolleys which cost a fortune and look space aged!
 

warbirdlover

Ender of all threads
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Jul 9, 2005
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I was playing behind a group where one of the guys had a motorized cart (don't know if it was this one). The battery went dead in his remote and it was funny watching him chase it down the fairway... :D

They are still very cool though if you always walk and can keep it charged and fresh batteries in the remote. :)
 
OP
TheTrueReview

TheTrueReview

"Playing it straight"
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Jan 8, 2009
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While an interesting and in-depth review, I find it far from True. I mean, TheTrueReview giving a True Review? It seems fishy, all I'm saying.

It's good that you have an enquiring mind Jeff. I'm happy to take your questions or you can PM me if you wish.

I like to review the everyday golf stuff that I use. Soon, I'll be posting a review of bamboo golf tees that are popular in Australia. I'm an end user who likes to write about his golfing experiences in case some others might find it useful. Hey, everybody has to have a hobby!! This is mine.
 
OP
TheTrueReview

TheTrueReview

"Playing it straight"
Supporting Member
Jan 8, 2009
8,204
6,042
Country
Australia Australia
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  • Thread starter
  • #8
I have the S3 Digital and its an awesome piece of kit. I've had it roughly 12 months, ....

It's not remote control....I think the remote control one which was refered to ealier is more than likely one of the Stewart trolleys which cost a fortune and look space aged!

MG, yes the Motocaddy S3 has a number of great extra features. It's the more upmarket model. I'm envious!! I would have liked to have picked up the S3.

Re the Stewart trolley. I looked at that about 18 months ago and although it looks a very sexy piece of equipment, I couldn't justify the AUD $3,000 or so purchase price. In my poking around I found that there was also a Chinese made copy (of course much cheaper) that had the exact body shape as the Stewart. I located one second hand & when I went to look at it, I took my golf bag with me. I found that the bottom of my golf bag it didn't even fit in the bottom receptacle of the copy. It pays to check things out fully.
 

LGL

Well-Known Member
Jan 26, 2009
44
0
My husband and I both have the S1 trolley and are really impressed with it. In my first 4 years of playing I have had a Powerkaddy and a HillBilly and had all sorts of problems with both of them.. Complete waste of money. Last year I bought the Motocaddy and I am still pleased with my choice. (Even more pleased with the price compared to yours in Oz - we paid £269 each and they threw in an umbrella holder as well.)
 

JEFF4i

She lives!
Supporting Member
Jul 3, 2006
13,531
84
It's good that you have an enquiring mind Jeff. I'm happy to take your questions or you can PM me if you wish.

I like to review the everyday golf stuff that I use. Soon, I'll be posting a review of bamboo golf tees that are popular in Australia. I'm an end user who likes to write about his golfing experiences in case some others might find it useful. Hey, everybody has to have a hobby!! This is mine.

I was just messing with you The True, its a great Review!
 

mtoller

Active Member
Feb 19, 2010
2
0
Thanks for the review - the Motocaddy certainly seems to be one of the best around.

I do wonder though why the price in Australia ($1295 for the S1 and $1495 for the S3 in the current Australian Golf Digest) are so completely out of line with the UK prices.
 

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