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Trail Cam Pics 2017

eclark53520

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I wanted to, for my own records, put my score estimate here so I can check it if I'm able to put him on the ground this fall.

I'm going to have more...but this is the biggest and only one we've marked for shooting so far.

Name: Alpha
Age: 4.5

LEFT:
G1: 5"
G2: 10"
G3: 10"
Main: 21"
Mass: 15"

Right:
G1: 5"
G2: 10"
G3: 10"
Main: 21"
Mass: 15"


Width: 17"

Total: 139"

5uf6ash.jpg


rNOEX3E.jpg


AcVyMBg.jpg


jU7ZKtQ.jpg
 
OP
eclark53520

eclark53520

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E, how long does it take to dress a deer?
Just field dressing(removing guts and organs in the field so it's lighter to drag out)? Maybe 10-15 minutes if I take my time. Once you figure out how to keep everything together and just pull it all out by the wind pipe after cutting that, it's super quick. I could probably do it under 5 if I really had to haul for whatever reason. I know guys that couldn't do it in under a half hour though...lol because they're too busy gagging and dry heaving.

Now, when it comes to butchering, it really depends. I personally go field to table all myself unless I get sausage made. I let the professionals take care of that right now, but I might get into that too.

Skinning - this can take anywhere from 15ish minutes to an hour...if you're able to hang them by the rear legs and do it while they're still pretty warm, 15 minutes and maybe less. If they're frozen or you have to do it on the ground or hung from the neck, it takes longer. One of these took me 15, the other took a half hour because she had to hang over night because my oldest wanted to see her.

Quartering - Front quarters come off in under a minute each(there's literally no bone to bone connection at all...). Then you pull out the back straps, which you take your time on because that's the best part so you want to make sure you get it all. 5ish minutes or so. Rear quarters are the difficult part if you don't understand the shape of the pelvis. Once you understand that, you can remove the rear quarter from the pelvis in a couple minutes - Total time? 20-30 minutes because you have to saw the bottom of the legs off too.

Breaking down the quarters and cleaning up the meat is probably the longest part, that usually takes me about an hour if I'm after it...but most times I'm having a few beers and shooting the shit with the guys so it takes longer. While we're doing this we usually grill up the inner loins and the heart and eat those to celebrate the kill.

Then it's wrapping the roasts/steaks for the freezer and we pressure can the scraps so we don't have to waste freezer space on ground venison or buy the beef/pork fat for grinding

So once it's hung up, it's usually a solid 2 hours to have the deer skinned, quartered, de-boned, cut into whatever we want, wrapped and frozen.

It's actually really fun and you get to know exactly how your meat is handled and cut/package exactly as you want it.
 

Fairwaysplitter3320

Recovering Equipment Ho...off the wagon again.
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Just field dressing(removing guts and organs in the field so it's lighter to drag out)? Maybe 10-15 minutes if I take my time. Once you figure out how to keep everything together and just pull it all out by the wind pipe after cutting that, it's super quick. I could probably do it under 5 if I really had to haul for whatever reason. I know guys that couldn't do it in under a half hour though...lol because they're too busy gagging and dry heaving.

Now, when it comes to butchering, it really depends. I personally go field to table all myself unless I get sausage made. I let the professionals take care of that right now, but I might get into that too.

Skinning - this can take anywhere from 15ish minutes to an hour...if you're able to hang them by the rear legs and do it while they're still pretty warm, 15 minutes and maybe less. If they're frozen or you have to do it on the ground or hung from the neck, it takes longer. One of these took me 15, the other took a half hour because she had to hang over night because my oldest wanted to see her.

Quartering - Front quarters come off in under a minute each(there's literally no bone to bone connection at all...). Then you pull out the back straps, which you take your time on because that's the best part so you want to make sure you get it all. 5ish minutes or so. Rear quarters are the difficult part if you don't understand the shape of the pelvis. Once you understand that, you can remove the rear quarter from the pelvis in a couple minutes - Total time? 20-30 minutes because you have to saw the bottom of the legs off too.

Breaking down the quarters and cleaning up the meat is probably the longest part, that usually takes me about an hour if I'm after it...but most times I'm having a few beers and shooting the shit with the guys so it takes longer. While we're doing this we usually grill up the inner loins and the heart and eat those to celebrate the kill.

Then it's wrapping the roasts/steaks for the freezer and we pressure can the scraps so we don't have to waste freezer space on ground venison or buy the beef/pork fat for grinding

So once it's hung up, it's usually a solid 2 hours to have the deer skinned, quartered, de-boned, cut into whatever we want, wrapped and frozen.

It's actually really fun and you get to know exactly how your meat is handled and cut/package exactly as you want it.
BOOM!
 

MCDavis

The Plaid Duffer
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Oct 19, 2006
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Just field dressing(removing guts and organs in the field so it's lighter to drag out)? Maybe 10-15 minutes if I take my time. Once you figure out how to keep everything together and just pull it all out by the wind pipe after cutting that, it's super quick. I could probably do it under 5 if I really had to haul for whatever reason. I know guys that couldn't do it in under a half hour though...lol because they're too busy gagging and dry heaving.

Now, when it comes to butchering, it really depends. I personally go field to table all myself unless I get sausage made. I let the professionals take care of that right now, but I might get into that too.

Skinning - this can take anywhere from 15ish minutes to an hour...if you're able to hang them by the rear legs and do it while they're still pretty warm, 15 minutes and maybe less. If they're frozen or you have to do it on the ground or hung from the neck, it takes longer. One of these took me 15, the other took a half hour because she had to hang over night because my oldest wanted to see her.

Quartering - Front quarters come off in under a minute each(there's literally no bone to bone connection at all...). Then you pull out the back straps, which you take your time on because that's the best part so you want to make sure you get it all. 5ish minutes or so. Rear quarters are the difficult part if you don't understand the shape of the pelvis. Once you understand that, you can remove the rear quarter from the pelvis in a couple minutes - Total time? 20-30 minutes because you have to saw the bottom of the legs off too.

Breaking down the quarters and cleaning up the meat is probably the longest part, that usually takes me about an hour if I'm after it...but most times I'm having a few beers and shooting the shit with the guys so it takes longer. While we're doing this we usually grill up the inner loins and the heart and eat those to celebrate the kill.

Then it's wrapping the roasts/steaks for the freezer and we pressure can the scraps so we don't have to waste freezer space on ground venison or buy the beef/pork fat for grinding

So once it's hung up, it's usually a solid 2 hours to have the deer skinned, quartered, de-boned, cut into whatever we want, wrapped and frozen.

It's actually really fun and you get to know exactly how your meat is handled and cut/package exactly as you want it.
tenor.gif
 

Fitzpatrick

Good Walk Spoiler
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Dec 19, 2006
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I was up the weekend before last, and had a decent-sized doe come to a stop right about 40 yards from my blind. Stood there, broadside, long enough for me to get into a decent stance so I could get a shot at it. Go to draw the bow back and SNAP! just before it lets off. Arrow goes flying off somewhere (found it later, broadhead lost a couple blades), and deer got startled and took off at a full sprint. I thought my bowstring broke, but looked down to see my release was in a couple of pieces. Spent the rest of the afternoon wishing I had a quiver of field points I could take shots at squirrels with so I could practice drawing back with my fingers.
 

Fairwaysplitter3320

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I was up the weekend before last, and had a decent-sized doe come to a stop right about 40 yards from my blind. Stood there, broadside, long enough for me to get into a decent stance so I could get a shot at it. Go to draw the bow back and SNAP! just before it lets off. Arrow goes flying off somewhere (found it later, broadhead lost a couple blades), and deer got startled and took off at a full sprint. I thought my bowstring broke, but looked down to see my release was in a couple of pieces. Spent the rest of the afternoon wishing I had a quiver of field points I could take shots at squirrels with so I could practice drawing back with my fingers.

No bueno!
 
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eclark53520

eclark53520

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Dec 24, 2007
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  • #15
I was up the weekend before last, and had a decent-sized doe come to a stop right about 40 yards from my blind. Stood there, broadside, long enough for me to get into a decent stance so I could get a shot at it. Go to draw the bow back and SNAP! just before it lets off. Arrow goes flying off somewhere (found it later, broadhead lost a couple blades), and deer got startled and took off at a full sprint. I thought my bowstring broke, but looked down to see my release was in a couple of pieces. Spent the rest of the afternoon wishing I had a quiver of field points I could take shots at squirrels with so I could practice drawing back with my fingers.

That really sucks dude!

Depending on your bow, drawing compounds with fingers, isn't a good idea. It can pretty easily result in string alignment issues and cause a derailment upon release.

I try to have a back up release in my bag at all times. Before I could afford two good ones, I bought a cheap one from Wal-Mart and made sure it was shooting with my good one. Now I have two good ones. That way in case one breaks, or maybe I drop one from the tree stand for whatever reason.
 

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