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We have some doctors here right? Question for you

eclark53520

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So, there's this argument in the hunting world that there is a 'dead zone' or 'no mans land' in a deer that exists below the spine and above the lungs where hunters can zip an arrow through the rib cage, hit no vital organ, and the deer lives and heals with seemingly no issues.


Do the lungs fill the available space inside the rib cage? Is there an air gap that exists between the lungs and the surrounding tissue?

Even if an air gap DID exist, wouldn't putting a 1-2" hole in the rib cage and exposing the area surrounding the lungs to atmospheric pressure cause the lungs to collapse and kill the deer?
 

SiberianDVM

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Deer are no different than any other mammal. The lungs are separated from the rib cage by a very small pleural space, defined by the pleural membrane, which allows the lungs to slide easily as they expand and contract. If the lung was not damaged, and only the pleural was torn, it could heal easily enough. If the lung was damaged, whatever cow you shot while thinking it was a deer, would develop a pneumo and/or hemothorax. Fatality would depend on the severity of the blood loss and respiratory compromise.

And you're still a dick.
 

MCDavis

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Deer are no different than any other mamm al. The lungs are separated from the rib cage by a very small pleural space, defined by the pleural membrane, which allows the lungs to slide easily as they expand and contract. If the lung was not damaged, and only the pleural was torn, it could heal easily enough. If the lung was damaged, whatever cow you shot while thinking it was a deer, would develop a pneumo and/or hemothorax. Fatality would depend on the severity of the blood loss and respiratory compromise.

And you're still a dick.
Damn...at least when I insult him, he knows I love his wi...um, him...yeah, him...
 
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eclark53520

eclark53520

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Deer are no different than any other mammal. The lungs are separated from the rib cage by a very small pleural space, defined by the pleural membrane, which allows the lungs to slide easily as they expand and contract. If the lung was not damaged, and only the pleural was torn, it could heal easily enough. If the lung was damaged, whatever cow you shot while thinking it was a deer, would develop a pneumo and/or hemothorax. Fatality would depend on the severity of the blood loss and respiratory compromise.

And you're still a dick.

Ok, so if I shove an arrow with a 1"-2.5" wide broadhead through the chest cavity of a deer, there's essentially no way to miss the lungs via some 'void' space created when the lungs 'deflate' during an exhale procedure.

Impossible to have passed an anatomy class and believe there is a 'void' in a deer. IMO....of course.

Thanks, Doc! I knew I could count on you to win me some internet.
 

bdcrowe

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Aug 30, 2004
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It seems to me, when mammals exhale, their chest cavity shrinks with the exhalation of air. When they inhale, the chest cavity expands. It seems the chest cavity is tightly coupled to the lungs. Where would this void be?
 

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